Tag: "textile"

Picture organic clothing

The impact of a product starts way before the extraction of raw materials. It is during the design process that their designers choose materials to use, their quantity, their quality and their performance.

The industrial beauty of Kvadrat textile production

Recently, a new chapter of industrialisation has begun at Kvadrat. By investing in Wooltex, Gaudium and Innvik, three significant European textile suppliers, they have become directly involved in the manufacturing processes of their textiles.

Mifuko baskets, work from the hands and hearts of Kenia

The aim of Mifuko Trust is to support Kenyan artisans and to help them find work through better entrepreneurship skills. Mifuko Trust works with small workshops in the slums of Nairobi and with women’s self help groups in rural areas.

Zieharsofika, a stiff cushion from a flat foam mat

By re-thinking cushioning techniques, the project uses conventional rubber foam mats which, with the help of elastic bands, come out as an ornamental form. The rectangular foam mat remains at a stretch and is only changed by layering and gathering it. Compared to common upholstery technics Zieharsofika achives the same result by compressing the foam. The gathering causes a strong and stiff core while the surface is still flexible and soft.

What is the future of these garments that are so deeply rooted in the past?

What makes Japanese denim special is not only the materials, machinery, and techniques, but also the people and ideas behind the process. This film reveals the intense passion and insight behind Japanese denim, but also poses the question; what is the future of these garments that are so deeply rooted in the past?

Knickerbocker. Away from speed, from mass and from thoughtless consumption

As most brands move toward what’s fast, cheap, and easy, Knickerbocker Manufacturing Co. reminds us the value of the opposite — away from speed, away from mass, away from thoughtless consumption.

Bardi’s Bowl Chair (1951), built through a combination of standardized and artisanal methods

Designed in 1951 by Italian-Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi, a semi-spherical seat resting lightly on a metallic ring structure, supported by four legs. Lina was a promoter of handcrafted pieces and of the interaction between Modernism and popular culture. In line with this idea, the Bardi’s Bowl Chair by Arper was built through a combination of standardized and artisanal methods, attempting to preserve Lina Bo Bardi’s craftsmanship while adding Arper technical expertise.

Crafting the Bang & Olufsen’s BeoPlay A9, Active Speaker System

B&O PLAY’s active speaker system, BeoPlay A9, which integrates an all-star line-up of dedicated components with provocative design to create a complete sound solution that is as easy to listen to as it is to decorate with.

Fabric collection inspired in Oaxaca’s context

Diario is a project that search for everyday objects from all around Mexico.
Mexico has a lot of tradition in making fabrics and that is why Moisés decide to travel to Oaxaca, there he met Felipe and José, they are two of four brothers that has the business of making fabrics since they were kids, he met them in their workshop in a lonely neighborhood.

A lamp inspired by the Portuguese roofs

Roof tiles is a lamp inspired by the Portuguese roofs. The metal sheet is bend and covered with Burel felt worked in order to make reference to the roof tiles, recreating the comfort and protection roofs offers to buildings.

Embroidery hoop becomes a wall clock

A wall clock which is originated from all the tools to cross stitch. Just a quartz machine was added. The process itself becomes the object of contemplation where the tool to fix the embroidering canvas, becomes the frame for the clock and the embroidered motifs becomes the reference numbers.

IKEA connecting social entrepreneurs in rural India to the global market

What does a typical IKEA supplier look like? Maybe you imagine a large factory filled with people making thousands of products a day. But we also work with much smaller producers. Artisans of handmade crafts, producing limited numbers of unique items. Meet the social entrepreneurs whose businesses are changing the lives of people in their communities.

Ostrich Pillow 100% Hand made in Spain by Studio Banana Things

Ostrich Pillow is a revolutionary power-napping device designed by Kawamura-Ganjavian. It has been designed to allow you to catch some sleep whilst on the go, it is filled with special silent silicon micro-beads to enhance sound reduction whilst remaining light-weight. Its smart adjustable elastic ring allows power-nappers of different sizes to use it comfortably. The carefully sourced fabric is extremely soft, making you feel cosy enough to literally drift away anywhere.

Teixidors, since 1983

On their traditional wooden looms, they create unique pieces using the highest quality raw materials, such as wool, cashmere, linen, silk and yak. Manual looms enable them to create deliciously imperfect borders on their pieces. A wool blanket becomes a work of art full of nuances, reflecting the individuality of each weaver.

How Primeknit was born

While sport shoes are usually made from many separate pieces, the Primeknit method digitally knits the entire upper in just one piece. Knitting fused yarn allows us to fine-tune the exact amount of flexibility and support needed in every part of the shoe. This means lightweight comfort that wraps seamlessly around your foot, whilst fewer materials produce less waste.

A collaborative open production line for shoe making

It is an experimental system focused on illustrating the possibility of a transparent, open and collaborative production line for shoe making and design. Don’t Run – Beta is intent on highlighting a possible alternative to mass production through small scale on demand digital fabrication.

Hardened Leather Chair

Hardened Leather Chair is made with an old technique for hardening leather in a 100% natural way. The technique has been used for corsets and armours, and is now being used as self-supported upholstery for a dining chair. The shape of the chair, which is commonly seen in plastic, gets a Nordic materiality by the use of leather and the frame of wood. Natural treated leather and ash wood for the structure.

Fragmented Memory Process. Phillip Stearns and Glitch Textiles

The project uses digital practices and processes to blur the lines between photography, data visualization, textile design, and computer science.

Ready Made Curtain by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec

The Ready Made Curtain requires the participation of the owner in its making. Everything one needs to fix the curtain is provided: a hanging cord, wall fixings, pegs, and a selection of Kvadrat textiles.

Documentary Helen Rodel by Estudos MMX

Documentary video that unveils the development of the collection Estudos MMXI, where the camera approachs the manual techniques used as a platforms by designer Helen Rödel, as well as her creative process and the context of her conception. The video also reveal the designer’s thoughts about the paradox of the time between weaving and thinking.

Envolta by Júlia Esqué

Júlia Esqué is a young designer from Barcelona who has worked for the re-interpretation of the 1988 Delta Prize , the “Coqueta” Chair by Pete Sans. The main attractive feature of the chair is the use of a belt that supports the tension generated by the weight of the user and prevents the arch opening of the legs. Thus, Júlia’s work has been inspired by the belt. Most importantly, because this part is the meeting point between the chair and the new proposal. It is mandatory for the proper use of the object by conceptualising about the tension that occurs in the chair use. Therefore, the aim of Envolta (which in catalan means “to wrap”) is to create something that serves to transport these items linking the subject with a belt. Turning one extreme inside the belt buckle get tense and holding the object.

N12 bikini by Continuum Fashion

The N12 bikini is the world’s first ready-to-wear, completely 3D-printed article of clothing. All of the pieces, closures included, are made directly by 3D printing and snap together without any sewing. N12 represents the beginning of what is possible for the near future.

Face to Face by Brian Frandsen & Kolding School

Brian Frandsen made Face to Face from carpets with the coorporation from egecarpets.

Corkutis by Poko Design

Corkutisis a cork skin that can be applied to a number of objects in order to protect them from heat, cracks, etc. It is a flexible, mouldable, waterproof and heat-insulating skin that can be applied to various objects that need protection: glass containers, bbq tongs, coffee cups, iPhones?, cars?,… Made from cork grains and natural latex, Corkutis is completely renewable and biodegradable.

Individually crafted shoes by Vialis Handmade

The history of Vialis shoes is an authentic Spanish tale.The quality of the materials, comfort, originality and authentic styling also play their part… Vialis shoes are made primarily from Italian leather and rely on an environmentally friendly vegetable tanning process. Sarenza is committed to offering you Vialis creations.

Unravel knitwear in fashion by Bauke Knottnerus

Phat Knits created by Dutch designer Bauke Knottnerus is a series of brilliantly over scaled furniture pieces. Despite the fact that the designer claims that he doesn’t really see himself as a furniture designer. “I’m more like a material designer,” he explains. “These things I make could end up as furniture or as textiles, it’s more like creating media that can be used to construct a coat or a carpet or a curtain.


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